Clambake

Every one of you listening to my voice, tell the world. Tell this to everybody, wherever they are. Watch the skies, everywhere, keep looking. Keep watching the skies.

Nothing says summer like a New England-style clambake with all the traditional fixings: steamed lobsters, clams, corn on the cob and a sunset. But clambakes are also a wonderful way to entertain in the early fall. In fact, Susan Warner, the founder of Nantucket Clambake Company, a leading catering firm that has been serving up traditional New England clambakes for more than 25 years, says September is her favorite time of year for clambakes. Says Warner, “September sunsets are spectacular.” For nature’s great encore, we recommend scheduling your clambake around a full moon. Moonlight is the perfect party lighting.

Clambake

Clambakes have a long history in North America. It is believed that the practice was originated more than 2,000 years ago by Native American tribes in the New England area who cooked lobsters and clams in sand pits lined with seaweed and hot rocks. Passed down through the generations, the tradition continues to be an important part of our heritage, history and culture.

Winslow Homer, A Clam-BakeWinslow Homer’s A Clam-Bake, 1873 

While there is nothing as beautiful as a clambake on the beach, backyard clambakes can be just as fabulous. The key is to serve traditional fare and use seaside touches in your décor. Try nautical rope down the center of a long table, driftwood for name cards, ball jars and driftwood hurricanes for candles, linens in a sandy hue or nautical stripe and plenty of shells. Of course, it won’t hurt to have a nice glass of rosé in hand and a glorious sunset in view.

ClambakeTable for 80 by the window? No problem. Right this way.

Introductory photo: Lana Turner
Introductory quote: The Thing (1953)

Photos: Carla McDonald

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