Hey, Bud, let’s party!

The spring party season is upon us—and just in the nick of time. According to a nationwide survey we commissioned to examine American party proclivities, we are a country of unabashed revelers: 80 percent of Americans say they “love attending parties.”  So party-eager are some of the 1,203 men and women surveyed in The Salonniere’s Spring ‘17 Party Poll that 12 percent say they’ve “crashed a party” they weren’t invited to and 5 percent have accidentally shown up for a party on the wrong day.

If those results don’t surprise you, grab a Royal Blush and come closer because these rascally results just might.

From snooping and swilling to RSVPing, The Salonniere's Spring '17 Party Poll offers a fascinating look at the party proclivities of Americans.

Richard Burton, Claudia Cardinale, and Elizabeth Taylor at a party in 1967. Photo: Getty

Swilling, Spilling, Snooping, and Sneaking

According to our party poll, some of us are doing some rather unfettered fêteing while attending parties in other people’s homes:

  • 38 percent admitted to snooping in the party host’s medicine cabinet or someplace else,
  • 33 percent acknowledged sneaking out of a party to avoid seeing someone,
  • 24 percent fessed up to getting frisky with their date in the party host’s home,
  • 12 percent admitted to hitting on someone else’s date,
  • 7 percent acknowledged ditching their date altogether and leaving a party with someone else, and
  • 6 percent admitted to stealing something from the party host’s home.

All that rascally revelry makes the little things that happen at parties—like breaking something (oops, 26 percent have done that) and spilling red wine (15 percent cop to that)—as benign as a mocktail.

From snooping and swilling to RSVPing, The Salonniere's Spring '17 Party Poll offers a fascinating look at the party proclivities of Americans.

Sophia Loren celebrating her 29th birthday in Rome in 1963. Photo: Getty

I Feel a Party Coming On

According to the survey, festive Americans are finding all kinds of reasons to throw or go to parties. Topping the list are birthday parties, with 73 percent saying they like celebrating America’s birthday on July 4th and 73 percent saying they like hosting or attending birthday parties for friends and family members. But party hosts take note: an overwhelming 72 percent of respondents said they’d never want to be the subject of a surprise party. Surprising, huh?

Other popular reasons for hosting or attending parties are New Year’s Eve (69%), Christmas (67%), Thanksgiving (60%), Cinco de Mayo (43%), St. Patrick’s Day (39%), Oktoberfest (38%), Memorial Day (36%), Labor Day (33%), Valentine’s Day (18%), Midsummer’s Eve (16%), Hanukkah (11%), and Bastille Day (10%). Proving that some people will look for any excuse to throw a party, six percent like to invite friends over to celebrate Arbor Day.

From snooping and swilling to RSVPing, The Salonniere's Spring '17 Party Poll offers a fascinating look at the party proclivities of Americans.

Actor Kirk Douglas, film director Robert Evans, actor Tony Curtis and their wives at a dinner party at Evans’ Beverly Hills home in 1968.

Trump Wins…Again

Dinner parties are one of the most popular ways to entertain, so we decided to query America about the person they’d most like to sit next to at a dinner party. More people (36%) chose President Donald Trump than any other newsmaker. In second place with 24 percent of the vote was former President Barack Obama. Other vote getters were Michelle Obama (12%); Oprah Winfrey (7%); Lady Gaga (6%); Hillary Clinton, Vladimir Putin, and First Lady Melania Trump (all tied at 4% each); Lin Manuel Miranda (3%); and Kim Kardashian (1%).

Perhaps one reason so many Americans chose President Trump is to chat about the White House Correspondents’ Association dinner on April 29th: one-third of those polled said he’s a party pooper for vowing to skip the event, an annual gathering of journalists and newsmakers that typically includes the sitting president.

Regardless, some might find these tips helpful for talking politics at the table. It would be best not to join the 38 percent of folks who admitted to drinking too much and saying or doing something they regretted.

From snooping and swilling to RSVPing, The Salonniere's Spring '17 Party Poll offers a fascinating look at the party proclivities of Americans.

Joan Crawford

Changing Party Practices

Finally, The Salonniere’s Spring ’17 Party Poll revealed some interesting insights into traditional practices like RSVPing to parties, bringing hostess gifts, and writing thank-you notes.  According to the survey:

  • 38 percent of people often ignore the request to RSVP to a party,
  • 20 percent intentionally wait until the last possible minute to RSVP,
  • 63 percent do not generally bring the host or hostess a gift, and
  • Just 15 percent say they send the host or hostess a thank-you note or email after a party.

Sammy Davis, Jr.

But who throws a party for the thank-you notes anyway? Bonne soirée, fellow socials, and don’t forget to prep those powder rooms. There are snoopers among us.

Commissioned by The Salonniere, The Salonniere’s Spring ’17 Party Poll was conducted in March 2017 by a leading national research firm. The survey respondents were 1,203 men and women from across the country who are between the ages 25 and 59 and have a household income in excess of $75,000 per year. The results have a margin of error of plus or minus five percent.

Party Poll Welcome Mash-Up

Welcome photo: Frank Sinatra and Ava Gardner in 1951 (AP Photo)
Welcome quote: Fast Times at Ridgemont High, 1982

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